Pros and Cons of Bunavail Approved by FDA

Pros

  •  Twice the bioavailability of Suboxone
  •  Promising alternative to methadone
  •  Treatment includes psychiatric therapy

Cons

  • Causes respiratory issues
  • Can cause death

Bio Delivery Sciences International’s new drug application has reached the final phase of approval by the FDA. Their supplemental application (sNDA) for Bunavail can step out of the management phase for opioid addiction patients and begin the use of the drug for treatment of opioid addiction.

Bunavail has twice the bioavailability of Suboxone film, which has increased it’s marketability ten fold and and therefore an attractive alternative for bottom line of the manufactures.

 

Bioavailability –  the proportion of a drug or other substance that enters the circulation when introduced into the body. When a drug is injected it has 100% bioavailability. Other means of administration have less than 100% bioavailability such as oral methods.

Bunavail will be administered …

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Narcan (Naloxone) Becoming a Life Saving Option for Police to Use

While calling Narcan (the brand name for active ingredient naloxone) an “antidote” to heroin isn’t quite accurate, the reality that the drug can be dispensed via a nasal spray in order to revive a drug user who is dying of overdose certainly give the impression that it is a miracle elixir out of a movie.

Recent articles from The Greenville Sun and and the Idaho Press highlight how police officers in Tusculum (Tennessee) and Nampa (Idaho) have been trained in administering the potentially life saving concoction.

This is emblematic of the full blown health crisis that opiate addiction and overdose now represents in the United States.

The United states contains 5% of the total world population yet consumes 80% of the world’s narcotic medications. The Center for Disease Control (CDC) has gone on record as describing the opiate addiction and …

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Newborn Opiate Addiction and Withdrawal

One of the saddest facts about prescription drug abuse is that a pregnant mother who abuses medicine will pass the effects to her unborn child. Unfortunately, it has become more and more common for newborn babies to be born addicted to prescription medications like OxyContin, Percocet and Vicodin. The Los Angeles Times reports that in 2009, more than 13,500 infants were born with neonatal abstinence syndrome (NAS); this translates to approximately one such birth every hour.

A recent New York Times article tells the story of one child that was only a few days old and had to be placed on methadone because his withdrawal symptoms were so severe. His mother abused OxyContin in the early stages of her pregnancy without her doctor’s knowledge. She tried to quit while pregnant but became so ill that the survival of her unborn …

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Fentanyl and Suboxone – The Evolution of Drug Abuse and Addiction

A new and controversial detox drug utilized in major rehab centers today
is buprenorphine which is better known as Suboxone. Touted as the “new methadone,” this powerful, synthetic opiate is prescribed to patients with chronic pain and drug addiction problems.

Ironically, both Suboxone and methadone are also addictive, just as heroin and other medications like Vicodin and Oxycotin are.

Suboxone is expensive and extremely difficult to obtain from a physician. A person usually has to be a patient of a substance abuse specialist or a pain management doctor to get a prescription. The average cost
for a month’s prescription of Suboxone is approximately $200-$700. When used for detox purposes, gradual withdrawal of the drug is necessary to prevent negative side effects such as seizures, cramps, diarrhea, fever and chills, vomiting, and nausea. This sublingual narcotic was approved by the FDA …

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Pills to Heroin: An Increasingly Common but Deadly Path

Small towns across the U.S. are seeing an increase in heroin use. The cause is dwindling supplies of the prescription narcotic oxycodone.

Oxycodone, which is sold under brand names like Oxycontin, Oxyneo, Percocet, and Percodan, is a powerful synthetic opioid derived from the papaver somniferum, or opium poppy plant. While oxycodone is legitimately prescribed for moderate to severe pain, it is also sold on the black market as a recreational drug. Powerful and addictive, regular users of oxycodone can quickly become addicted. An opiate addict becomes physically ill within hours after their last dose, prompting them to seek out more drugs to avoid withdrawal.

With the rising costs of prescription drugs, users of oxycodone are turning to heroin to find a cheaper way to maintain their habits. Any drug of the opiate class can be substituted for one

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Prescription Opioid Analgesics: The New U.S. Drug Epidemic

According to the 2007 data released by the Center for Disease Control, prescription drug overdose resulted in approximately three deaths per hour. With nearly 27,000 such deaths that year, the CDC has appropriately classified the growing trend as an epidemic. Of course, in years since 2007, the prescription medication epidemic has really hit a fever pitch.

The main culprit is the prescription opioid analgesic. For centuries, opioids have been used to treat pain. Recent studies have routinely found them safe, if used according to the doctor’s orders. They have been especially successful in managing the pain of cancer victims and persons suffering from degenerative diseases. However, one of the trends feeding the epidemic is the growing use of these drugs to help manage chronic pain in non-cancer patients. This has paved the way for misuse; blamed in part on …

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Suboxone – Controversial but Apparently Effective

A study recently completed by Harvard Medical School and McLean Hospital found that patients who are addicted to prescription opiate painkillers have a better chance of treatment success if they take a drug called Suboxone. Despite the positive results of the study, the use of Suboxone for treatment of opiate drugs is controversial.( Find out what suboxone detox is like).
The study involved 653 people who were addicted to prescription painkillers and who were treated with Suboxone, which is a mixture of buprenorphine and nalaxone. This was
the first large-scale clinical trial that tested different treatment options for the growing problem of prescription drug abuse. The study focused on the abuse of prescription opioid drugs like OxyContin, Vicodin and Percocet rather than illicit drugs like heroin or cocaine.

Suboxone helps treat opioid addiction by mirroring many of the effects of

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